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Demi Lovato ‘trying to move on’ amid ex’s cryptic posts

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Demi Lovato

Max Ehrich posted messages to social media Tuesday seemingly alleging that ex-fiancèe Demi Lovato was being “abused,” but an insider told Page Six the singer is doing well and trying to move forward.

The “Young and the Restless” put up cryptic notes in an Instagram Story that said “#FreeDemi” then “#FreeDemetria,” followed by a third note saying “#FreeDemetria from people that have abused her,” according to screengrabs captured by twitter account #onlyforeverddl.

Ehrich also posted concerning messages to his Instagram about Jeffrey Epstein, which have since been deleted.

“‘Jeffrey Epstein’ me = Try to silence me for exposing the truth to the world,” he wrote.

To his Instagram Story, he added, “I’m so grateful for social media…  For it gives a voice to every human being. If used purposefully; It shines awareness on things that need to be addressed. I’ll be posting on here for updates every few hours with pics… In case people try to ‘Jeffrey Epstein’ me.”

But the insider told Page Six on Tuesday, “It’s unclear what Max is referring to with his posts,” and that “Demi is happy, healthy, and trying to move on from all this by staying busy with work.”

Last week, 28-year-old Lovato ended her engagement to Ehrich, 29, following Page Six’s exclusive report that there was trouble in paradise for the couple.

The actor then turned to social media to publicly beg Lovato to reconsider.

“I’m here in real time with y’all. I love Demetria and just want her to be healthy and safe,” he wrote on his Instagram Story, also sharing that they hadn’t spoken since their split. “I love you always,” he added.

Their breakup came after old posts by Ehrich surfaced of the actor confessing his love for several other celebrities including Selena Gomez and Miley Cyrus.

Lovato called the posts fake news but that didn’t stop the pair from heading to splitsville.

The exes got engaged in July, just a few months after they began dating.

Ehrich’s rep did not immediately return Page Six’s request for comment.


Source: nypost.com

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TikTok videos spark rumors about ‘Bachelorette’ villain

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Videos from a disgruntled TikTok user appear to confirm on and off-screen drama about “The Bachelorette” contestant Yosef Aborady.

Posted starting on October 13 by Carly Hammond, the videos refer to a relationship she had with “the villain on this season of ‘The Bachelorette.’”

Though only two episodes of Season 16, starring Clare Crawley, have aired so far, Aborady has already gained a reputation as this season’s trouble-stirrer. Blogger Reality Steve tweeted that he confirmed with Hammond that her story was about Aborady, and had seen texts between the two.

In the first episode, contestant Tyler C. confronted Aborady, a medical-device salesman, about negative rumors he had heard. “Coming into this, I was in a weird position to learn some stuff about Yosef,” he said. “A lot of being reckless on Instagram and flirting with girls where I’m from who know me.”

Hammond’s claims play into this narrative. In the first video, she alleged that Aborady DMed her on Instagram, where they chatted for a few weeks. He was then cast on “The Bachelorette.” They continued to message, and would Facetime “for hours” and discussed “having a family and having kids and getting married,” she said.

Aborady allegedly traveled to visit Hammond. While he was there, Hammond received a video “of him jerking off to another girl and he was talking about how he wanted to f – – k her in that video,” she said.

A second video, posted on TikTok on October 18, shows messages Hammond alleges are from this same man, though his name is blocked out from the screenshots.

Today, she posted two more videos about the situation. Though Hammond says she blocked the contestant, he was still viewing her social media off his dog’s account. An Instagram profile for the account shown in screenshots, DapperDanAndAMan, does not appear to currently exist on Instagram.

The Post has reached out to ABC and Warner Bros for comment.

In addition to the claims made by Tyler C. on the show, Aborady is also seen in promos yelling at Crawley. He’s called her “immature” and was taken aback by her behavior on the most recent episode.


Yosef and Clare on the "Bachelorette."

Yosef and Clare on the “Bachelorette.”

“The Bachelorette” airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. on ABC. 


Source: nypost.com

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Bruce Springsteen’s new album, ‘Letter to You,’ is a comforting nostalgic trip

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Bruce Springsteen’s new album, “Letter to You,” feels like a postcard from a bygone era — one long before texts, FaceTime and Zoom.

Released on Friday, it might as well have arrived by Pony Express from decades ago.

Certainly, this is a nostalgia trip back to a more innocent, less scary time with an old friend — and his old friends. That would be the E Street Band, which, after not appearing on last year’s “Western Stars” LP, is back working with the Boss for the first studio album since 2014’s “High Hopes.”

Even more significantly, this is the first time Springsteen and the E Street Band have recorded an entire studio album while playing all together since 1984’s classic “Born in the U.S.A.”

No doubt, this was a family reunion in every sense. Even Clarence Clemons — who passed away in 2011 — is there, in the spirit of his nephew Jake Clemons on sax.

That warm family feeling is a familiar, comforting presence throughout “Letter to You,” which is a sonic tonic for these troubling times. That sense of history and deep-rooted connectivity from having rocked through the ages together extends to George Theiss — Springsteen’s last surviving comrade from his first band, the Castiles — whose 2018 death inspired the new LP.


Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen

From the moment he sings “One minute you’re here/Next minute you’re gone” on the opening track “One Minute You’re Here” — which serves to bridge the wistful country-folk of “Western Stars” to “Letter to You” — there’s a sense of loss and longing at the heart of it all.

Gracefully confronting his own aging, the 71-year-old Springsteen directly addresses being the “Last Man Standing” from the Castiles on one of the standout songs: “Rock of ages lift me somehow/Somewhere high and hard and loud/Somewhere deep into the heart of the crowd/I’m the last man standing now.”


Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen

Despite the fragility of mortality in counting “the names of the missing,” there’s a muscularity to the music with the E Street Band that, pre-pandemic, was clearly meant for these tunes to be taken on tour in arenas and stadiums.

“Letter to You” — which, although framed as a romantic rocker in the title track, continues the careerlong conversation Springsteen has been having both with his fans and his beloved band — ends with hope amidst the heartache on “I’ll See You in My Dreams”: “We’ll meet and live and laugh again . . . For death is not the end.”


Source: nypost.com

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Alexandra Holzer on growing up in a famous ghost hunting family

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Alexandra Holzer on growing up in a famous ghost hunting family

Ghosts are Alexandra Holzer’s family business.

That’s because the reality show star is the daughter of Hans Holzer, who’s often referred to “America’s first ghost hunter.” He even inspired Dan Aykroyd for the 1984 hit “Ghostbusters.”

Hans, who did the bulk of his work in the 1960’s and ’70s, has been deceased since 2009 but wrote over 120 books on the supernatural and was involved in investigating famous cases such as The Amityville Horror. His daughter Alexandra continues the legacy on Travel Channel’s “The Holzer Files.”

Season 2, premiering Oct. 29 at 11 p.m., follows Holzer and her paranormal team as they revisit her father’s famous cases. New York native Holzer, 49, talked to The Post about what it was like growing up as the daughter of a famous ghost hunter, “The Holzer Files,” and more.

What’s it been like for you to revisit your father’s work for the show?

It forced me to get to know Dad more intimately and see how he was working. I grew up in the environment of a healthy diet of the supernatural. So that [aspect] was nothing new for me, but to actually go through all of his archives and start digging through the letters and handwritten notes and photography and audio recordings…it’s been a long time, he’s been gone eleven years. It was very emotional to hear his voice.

Growing up, were you aware that your father’s line of work was unusual?

Oy vey, when I was in grade school, it was in the ‘70s and we always gave presents to the teachers. And my mom said, “Let’s wrap up some of your father’s books.” So [the teacher] sits there and opens the presents, and he gets to mine and I start scooting back my chair as if I want to become indivisible. Because nobody at that time thought that [the supernatural] was cool, and I wasn’t very popular to begin with. The teacher opens up books with “ghosts” and “witches” in the title, and everyone started to look at me. I was like, ‘I am so dead, I am not coming back to school tomorrow!’

My friend’s fathers went to work with suits and ties and briefcases. My father’s quasi-briefcase was filled with equipment and ghost photography.

You initially did not pursue the family business. What made you change?

It was because [ghost hunting] was constantly in my face. When I got a bit older, my mother also went to FIT, so I said, “I’ll go down that route,” because I felt embarrassed. So I kind of did go away from the family business, and I went to FIT for advertising design and graphics. Then, in my late 20s, I had [a supernatural experience] with my late aunt. That really opened up the conversation with my father, and that’s how I accepted my role in the family business. It’s evolved.

Are there any of your dad’s cases that you most enjoyed revisiting on the show?

Merchant House, because as a New Yorker, it’s there. These are amazing cases because they’re so layered in history of different timelines and people who have died and how they died. Merchant House is a beautiful curated mansion and museum. And that’s my stomping ground. As a native New Yorker who has also created her family here like my parents before me, I’m very proud that I’m able to continue the work in that next generation.


Source: nypost.com

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Amber Rose: I taught my son, 7, about sex, consent and periods

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Amber Rose: I taught my son, 7, about sex, consent and periods

This celebrity kid isn’t even in the double-digits yet but he already knows about the birds and the bees.

“Once he hits 13 and the girls in his classroom are getting their periods and the boys are like, ‘That’s disgusting, she’s bleeding,’ he’ll be like, ‘That’s nothing … I knew that since I was 6 years old, dude; get with the program.’ ”

Rose opened up about their honest chats to “Red Table” hosts Jada Pinkett Smith, 49, her daughter, Willow Smith, 19, and her mother, Adrienne Banfield-Norris, 67, as well as fellow episode guest Rumer Willis, 32.

She told them that educating her son so early about often-taboo topics has made him eager to learn more. “He’s very curious now,” Rose went on.

She’s also been frank with Sebastian about consent when it comes to touching women’s bodies.

“He’s like, ‘Mom, you’ve got a jiggly butt,’ and he’ll just come behind me and jiggle my butt,” she said, to which she responds by gently telling him, “That’s my private area, and you don’t touch Mommy’s private area, OK?”

He understands, she said, and he also gets that the same applies to other women — including when he’s at dad Wiz Khalifa’s house. “His dad’s a rapper,” she said, noting with subtle shade that while she believes she and ex-husband Khalifa co-parent very well, “it’s a different dynamic over there.”


Source: nypost.com

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Camila Cabello debuts new haircut

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Camila Cabello debuts new haircut

Camila Cabello is now a short-haired señorita.

The “Havana” singer, 23, showed off a new haircut that reached just past her shoulders on Thursday, having chopping multiple inches off her curls.

“LOST MY SHORT HAIR VIRGINITY!!!!,” she captioned the photo, which was taken by her boyfriend, Shawn Mendes. “I’ve had long hair all my life it’s TIME TO FEEL THE AIR ON THESE SHOULDERS BABY.”

She followed the pic up with another cuddling Mendes.

After the couple shut down rumors of a breakup, Cabello was featured heavily in the sneak peek at Mendes’s forthcoming Netflix documentary, with the “In My Blood” singer even revealing that “every song” he’s written has been about Cabello.


Source: nypost.com

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Here’s when your favorite fall TV shows’ seasons premiere

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Here

Even as the world has changed, the Pearson family is returning — and so is Baby Yoda.

Pandemic-related production delays have shaken up the TV schedule, forcing networks to get creative and even resurrect some cancelled shows. Others got the ax sooner than planned, such as ABC’s “Stumptown” and Netflix’s “GLOW.” But a host of fall TV staples are slated to come back, and they’ve never felt more like comfort food.

Here’s your essential guide to the returning crowd favorites this season.

“Black-ish,” Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m. on ABC

Season 7 of “Black-ish” came back Oct. 21, continuing to follow the antics of Dre (Anthony Anderson), Rainbow (Tracee Ellis Ross) and the rest of the Johnson family. If you were confused about when the show officially returned, that’s because it had a two-part “Election Special” episode that aired Oct. 4 ahead of Season 7’s premiere.

“Superstore,” Oct. 29 at 8 p.m. on NBC

Season 6 of the popular workplace comedy will return with a surprise: Although star America Ferrera had announced her departure from the show, she’s not leaving as soon as she planned. Amy (Ferrera) will be in two episodes this season, which will also include a storyline about how the coronavirus pandemic is impacting the Cloud 9 world.

“This Is Us,” Oct. 28 at 9 p.m. on NBC

After a seven-month hiatus forced by production delays, the Pearson family is finally back, kicking off Season 5 with a two-hour premiere. This season of America’s favorite tearjerker will begin with Kevin (Justin Hartley), Kate (Chrissy Metz) and Randall (Sterling K. Brown) celebrating their 40th birthdays.

“The Mandalorian,” Oct. 30 on Disney+

Almost a year after Season 1 premiered last November and social media went ga-ga for Baby Yoda, the first live-action “Star Wars” show returns, along with the adventures of the Child, a k a Baby Yoda and Mando (Pedro Pascal, “Game of Thrones”). Although Disney has not officially announced Season 2’s new cast members, it’s been widely reported that Rosario Dawson, Timothy Olyphant and Katee Sackhoff (“Battlestar Galactica”) are joining.

“S.W.A.T.,” Nov. 11 on CBS

Shawn Ryan’s spinoff to his hit, “The Shield,” returns for its fourth season, which will continue to follow Daniel “Hondo” Harrelson (Shemar Moore, “Criminal Minds”) and his team. The season kicks off with Hondo and the gang investigating whether an international crime lord has resurfaced.

“The Crown,” Nov. 15 on Netflix

Season 4 of the hit royal drama returns, continuing Olivia Colman’s reign as Queen Elizabeth II and Tobias Menzies as Prince Philip. (A swan song for both actors, as Jonathan Pryce will play Philip in the show’s final two seasons while Imelda Staunton will take over as Elizabeth.) This season will add two new faces: Newcomer Emma Corrin will play the young Princess Diana, and Gillian Anderson (“The X-Files”) will play Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

“Law & Order: SVU,” Nov. 12 at 9 p.m. on NBC

The world might have changed as the pandemic rages on, but TV stalwart “Law & Order: SVU” comfortingly goes on. Season 22 will continue to follow Olivia Benson (Mariska Hargitay) and her team into history — as the show is now the longest-running live-action primetime series in TV history.


Source: nypost.com

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These New York movie theaters are reopening and easy to reach from NYC

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These New York movie theaters are reopening and easy to reach from NYC

New York movie theaters have finally reopened! Mostly!

This week, Gov. Cuomo permitted cinemas in the state outside of New York City to start screening films again starting Friday, at 25% capacity and with a maximum of 50 masked patrons.

Still, it’s a big enough step for the industry that Regal backpedaled on its plan to temporarily shutter all of its US theaters, and decided to keep 11 in New York open.

NYC may not have the movies back yet, but you can make the trek to go see one if you live in the city. Here is the closest open theater to each of the five boroughs.

Manhattan

For Midtown and lower Manhattan: Bow Tie Cinemas (409-415 14th St., Hoboken, NJ) — a 15-minute drive from Times Square or 23-minute bus ride, and you have to go into New Jersey. For upper Manhattan: Showcase Cinemas de Lux Cross County (2 South Drive, Yonkers, NY) — a 20-minute drive from Columbia University, or 90 minutes via train and bus.

Brooklyn

Regal Lynbrook & RPX (321 Merrick Road, Lynbrook, NY) — a 42-minute drive from Williamsburg, or 90 minutes via several trails. AMC Roosevelt Field is equidistant for Brooklynites closer to the East River.

Queens

AMC Roosevelt Field (630 Old Country Road, Garden City, NY) — a 25-minute drive from Flushing Meadows Corona Park, or 90 minutes via bus.

The Bronx

Showcase Cinemas de Lux Cross County (2 South Drive, Yonkers, NY) — a 15-minute drive from Grand Concourse, or 40 minutes via train and bus.

Staten Island

AMC Aviation 12 (1200 S. Stiles St., Linden, NJ) — a 30-minute drive from the Ferry Terminal.


Source: nypost.com

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Study: TV industry falls short of off-camera inclusivity

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Minimal progress made in promoting diversity for behind-the-camera jobs, says new UCLA study

When Zendaya won last month’s Emmy Award for top drama series actress, her triumph seemed to underscore the TV industry’s progress toward inclusivity.

The Euphoria star became the second Black winner in the category in five years, following Viola Davis’ drought-ending win for How to Get Away with Murder in 2015.

But such success contrasts with the lag in diversity in behind-the-camera jobs and among TV executives as measured by the yardsticks of race and gender, according to a new University of California, Los Angeles, study released Thursday.

“There has been a lot of progress for women and people of colour in front of the camera,” Darnell Hunt, dean of the school’s social sciences division and the study’s co-author, said in a statement. “Unfortunately, there has not been the same level of progress behind the camera.”

That’s most notable in Hollywood’s executive suites, where little has changed since the UCLA study tallied the numbers five years ago, he said.

Underrepresented and overlooked

As of September 2020, the study found that 92 per cent of chair and CEO positions at TV networks and studios were held by white people, with men filling 68 per cent of those posts. Among senior executives, 84 per cent were white and 60 per cent were male. In 2015, the executive suites were 96 per cent white and 71 per cent male, which represents what Hunt calls “minimal change.” 

That’s especially telling given the racial reckoning fanned by the police-connected deaths of George Floyd and other Black Americans, according to Hunt. While media corporations have voiced support for the Black Lives Matter movement, their actions have failed to match their words, Hunt said in an interview.

This is despite the growing market share represented by consumers of colour as they edge toward becoming the majority demographic in the United States, Hunt said Wednesday. According to the U.S. Census, the country in 2019 was 60 per cent white and 40 per cent people of colour, with the latter figure projected to reach 53 per cent by 2050.

“Hollywood has been trying to figure out how to acknowledge the relationship between diversity and the bottom line without fundamentally changing the way they do business,” he said. “If they were serious about reading the way the wind is blowing and where the market is going,” more executives reflecting that would be hired.

“But they haven’t done that,” he said, acknowledging a notable exception in Channing Dungey, who at ABC became the president of a major broadcast network, jumped to Netflix and this week was named chairman of the Warner Bros. Television Group. Dungey is Black.

Inclusivity also lags for those in offices outside the C-suite. In the 2018-19 season, people of colour were, on average, 24 per cent of credited writers and 22 per cent of directors for all broadcast, cable and streaming episodes.

Prominent Black Canadian filmmakers are calling out anti-Black racism in Canada’s film and television industry, and are hopeful it’s a step toward real change. 2:15

The underrepresentation of people of colour in decision-making and creative positions means that ethnic characters’ storylines “may lack authenticity or will be written stereotypically or even ‘raceless,”‘ Ana-Christina Ramon, a co-author of the report, said in a statement.

Women, at slightly more than half the population, represented 28.6 per cent of online series creators, 28.1 per cent in broadcast and 22.4 per cent in cable. While they made gains in those and most other on — and off — camera jobs, they remain underrepresented in nearly all. 

The study, which examined 453 scripted broadcast, cable and online TV shows from the 2017-18 season and 463 such shows from 2018-19, found that people of colour on-screen are collectively approaching proportional representation.

“We’ve come a long way in that regard” from UCLA’s first study of the 2011-12 season, Hunt said.

But the advances are lopsided when examined by ethnicity. Black actors have led the way in inclusion for more than a decade, Hunt said, while Latinos are consistently underrepresented, Indigenous people have been “virtually invisible” and Asian American numbers ebb and flow.

Middle Eastern and North African inclusiveness has been on the rise.

“But we’re not saying anything about the quality of the images, because in some cases inclusion can be a bad thing for those groups because we’re taking about stereotypical images,” he said. “That’s another topic.”


Source: cbc.ca

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