Connect with us

Entertainment

Britney Spears’ father breaks his silence on #FreeBritney movement

Published

on

Jamie Spears is sick and tired of how #FreeBritney — an increasingly vocal online movement claiming his daughter Britney Spears is a prisoner in a gilded cage — is painting him as a villain.

An upset Jamie, 68, told The Post that the campaign, which posits him as a cruel and opportunistic father keeping the 38-year-old pop princess under his emotional and financial control in a 12-year-long legal conservatorship, “is a joke.”

“All these conspiracy theorists don’t know anything. The world don’t have a clue,” he said. “It’s up to the court of California to decide what’s best for my daughter. It’s no one else’s business.”
Jamie angrily denied long-standing rumors that he or anyone else is skimming money off the top of Britney’s estate.

“I have to report every nickel and dime spent to the court every year,” he said. “How the hell would I steal something?”


A sign that reads "Jail Jamie, Free Britney, Investigate Lou" sits on the ground as supporters of Britney Spears gather outside a courthouse in downtown for a #FreeBritney protest as a hearing regarding Spears' conservatorship is in session on July 22, 2020

A sign that reads “Jail Jamie, Free Britney, Investigate Lou” sits on the ground as supporters of Britney Spears gather outside a courthouse in downtown for a #FreeBritney protest as a hearing regarding Spears’ conservatorship is in session on July 22, 2020

The dad said what really bothers him is the aggressiveness of the #FreeBritney supporters. “People are being stalked and targeted with death threats,” he said. “It’s horrible. We don’t want those kinds of fans.

“I love my daughter,” Jamie continued, getting emotional. “I love all my kids. But this is our business. It’s private.”

Britney’s life and struggles, however, have long played out in public.

And recently, celebrities including Ruby Rose, Miley Cyrus, Paris Hilton, ­Ariel Winter and Rose McGowan have lent their support to the #FreeBritney movement, Instagramming and tweeting about how the singer is allegedly unable to make her own decisions about her career, personal life and health because of the ongoing conservatorship.

“Her father doesn’t allow her to drive, all of her calls & messages are monitored, she’s not allowed to vote, hang with anyone or spend her money without permission. And if she breaks a ‘rule’ he threatens to have her kids taken away,” claims one change.org petition, with more than 100,000 signatures, lobbying for Britney’s freedom.

The #FreeBritney crusaders have blasted social media with posts, purporting  to show that Jamie claimed Britney had dementia in 2008, and that Jamie and the star’s business manager, Lou Taylor of Tri Star Sports and Management, are ­embezzling from her.

Lately, Britney’s camp has started striking back: Taylor, who did not return calls from The Post, recently settled with #FreeBritney supporter Bryan Kuchar after suing him last year for creating Web sites that called Taylor the “mastermind controlling the pop star.”

A number of Spears insiders insist that the star is not a helpless pawn.


Britney Spears

Britney Spears

“Absolutely not,” Charlie Ebersol, who dated Britney for eight months in 2015, told The Post. As for the wild rumor that Jamie hires his daughter’s boyfriends and pays them $1,000 a week to date her, Ebersol said: “Not [true] in any way, shape or form.”

One insider said that while Jamie is “not perfect,” he “really stepped up for Britney.”

The conservatorship, which put much of the star’s decision-making into the hands of Jamie and lawyers, was established 12 years ago, after Britney’s very public meltdown.

At the time, it was meant to be temporary. But the fact that it’s gone on so long makes some question who is really benefiting from it. Those close to the singer, however, say that Britney is more comfortable with — and ambivalent about — the situation than people realize.

“It’s not at all a conservatorship like you read about for old people,” said the insider. “It protects her in a way people like Michael Jackson weren’t protected, from themselves and from other people. She’s been able to perform all this time because performing is where she is happiest.


Supporters of Britney Spears gather outside a courthouse in downtown for a #FreeBritney protest as a hearing regarding Spears' conservatorship is in session on July 22, 2020 in Los Angeles, California.

Supporters of Britney Spears gather outside a courthouse in downtown for a #FreeBritney protest as a hearing regarding Spears’ conservatorship is in session on July 22, 2020 in Los Angeles, California.

“When she’s left to her own devices is where the trouble starts. She does have some serious issues.”

Born in Mississippi and raised in Louisiana, Britney rocketed to stardom at age 17 with her first single, “. . . Baby One More Time” and remained one of the most popular artists of the next few years.

Her first eyebrow-raising behavior was in 2004, when she married a childhood pal on a whim and got an annulment 55 hours later because, according to court documents, she “lacked understanding of her ­actions.”

But things really began to unravel in 2006, after she had  wed backup dancer Kevin Federline and given birth to their eldest son, Sean. Child Services repeatedly checked in on the family, including after the baby fell out of a high chair and was seen in a vehicle on Britney’s lap rather than in a car seat.

The next year was a whirlwind of ­unhinged TV appearances; a marriage split (and subsequent divorce) two months after the birth of her second son, Jayden, with Federline; and worrisome paparazzi photos of Britney partying hard with Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan.

Then, in early 2007, Britney checked in and quickly out of rehab, showed up at a Los Angeles beauty shop and shaved off her  hair, and attacked a paparazzo’s car with an umbrella. She went back to rehab, gave a jaw-droppingly sad performance at the VMAs, was booked on hit-and-run charges (later dropped) and lost custody of her children to Federline.

That seemed to be the straw that truly broke her. In January 2008, Britney was hauled away in an ambulance after a three-hour police standoff in which she refused to return her sons to Federline’s custody.

Weeks later, she was again taken to a hospital and placed on a psychiatric hold — leading a Los Angeles court to declare her father her legal conservator to handle virtually all her affairs.


Singer Britney Spears and Charlie Ebersol arrive at the 2015 Billboard Music Awards

Singer Britney Spears and Charlie Ebersol arrive at the 2015 Billboard Music Awards

During the past 12 years, she has been allowed to make records, tour and even have a Las Vegas concert residency — leading many to speculate: If she can work, why isn’t she allowed to make her decisions?

When asked whether Britney is mentally unstable, ex-boyfriend Ebersol was resolute: “Absolutely not,” he said. That statement was echoed by other former boyfriends including David Lucado, who dated her in 2014. (Britney is now dating Iranian-born bodybuilder Sam ­Asghari, 26.)

Adam Streisand agrees. The Los Angeles-based lawyer was hired by Britney in 2008 after her hospitalization, until a doctor reported that she was not competent enough to choose her own lawyer and the court appointed her a new one.

He told The Post that, even when she was near rock bottom, Britney did not appear crazy, “just agitated. She understood the concept of a conservatorship but just did not want her father to be the conservator.”
Nonetheless, Streisand does not believe that Jamie or the business managers have been skimming money from Britney. It’s believed that her fortune, said to be anywhere from $60 million to $215 million, was placed in a trust as part of the conservatorship.

“Jamie’s a weird guy, he’s a control freak,” Streisand said. “But I don’t see him as some sort of criminal mastermind in this.”

The Spears family is splintered, however. Last summer, Jamie was temporarily removed from the conservatorship after he allegedly broke down a door and grabbed Sean during an altercation, resulting in a restraining order that forbids him from seeing Britney’s two sons. In March, Jayden lashed out against Jamie on Instagram. Britney’s mom, Lynne, who divorced Jamie in 2002, has reportedly liked at least one #FreeBritney post. Last week, Britney’s brother, Bryan, said that the star wanted out of the conservatorship — but that “it has been a great thing for our family.”

The next hearing on the conservatorship is to be held Aug. 22, and it’s unclear what Britney herself wants to come of it.

Meanwhile, some are beginning to wonder if maybe Britney herself is toying with fans.

While no one disputes her mental-health struggles, Britney has had a knack for masterminding key aspects of her career ever since she came up with the concept of wearing a Catholic-schoolgirl uniform for the video of her first smash hit, “. . . Baby One More Time,” when she was only 17.

By design or not, some say the notoriously agoraphobic singer now stars in a shrewdly curated Instagram feed that keeps her in the public eye without her ever having to leave home.

Her feed is a mix of inspirational bromides, kittenish dancing and provocative, New Age-type musings from which #FreeBritney believers seek hidden meanings.

“I feel like every post is cryptic code for something…” Nicolle Ronayne commented on an Instagram photo Britney posted about the “Pink Planet… aka GJ 504b… the planet made of pink gas!”


Source: nypost.com

Entertainment

Tim Minchin tries to stay ‘Upright’ in dark, complicated comedy

Published

on

By

Two people take a wild ride through the Australian desert in “Upright,” a dark comedy on Sundance Now.

The eight-episode series, which originally aired on Australia’s Fox Showcase and the UK’s Sky Atlantic, was co-written and co-directed by star Tim Minchin. He plays Lucky Flynn, a depressed musician driving to visit his dying mother, his treasured piano attached by trailer to his car. Distracted, he smashes into a Toyota truck driven by Meg (Milly Alcock), a feisty, foul-mouthed 16-year-old whose wrist is fractured in the crash. They strike up a grudging friendship and, with Lucky’s piano on the back of Meg’s truck, embark on a cross-country journey that detours into humorous and dramatic territory.

Minchin, 44, the provocative, multi-hyphenate Australian comedian, is best-known in the US as the composer/lyricist of Broadway’s “Matilda The Musical” and “Groundhog Day” and for his role as Atticus Fetch on Showtime’s “Californication.” He spoke to The Post from Sydney, where he lives with his wife and two young children, about Lucky and about working with Alcock.

Is this a story based on someone you know or on a personal interaction?

It’s a great set-up, but it’s not mine. The [series] creator, Chris Taylor, who’s known in Australia as a comedy satirist who doorstops politicians, had been trying to move into narrative television … and he sent me this one-page pitch, trying to make something that felt a bit like “Seinfeld” or “The Trip” with Steve Coogan. I thought the premise was great … and I recognized in myself the desire to make a drama. I wasn’t in the mood for comedy and didn’t want my next project to be flippant. I wanted to make something special.


Tim Minchin and Milly Alcock in "Upright."

Tim Minchin and Milly Alcock in “Upright.”

Why weren’t you in the mood for comedy?

I’d moved to LA and given up my touring career for a huge project I worked on for years, an animated feature [“Larrikins”] at DreamWorks. I’d be acting, composing, directing. Then Universal bought DreamWorks and trashed four years of my life. I’d turned 40 and then “Groundhog Day” closed early on Broadway. I was a bit battered. We’d been living away from Australia for 12 years … and I guess I was really thinking a lot about going home and about spending so much time away from my family. So the story of a guy carrying a burden across the desert to his home, where he hasn’t been for eight years…I felt I brought a bit of emotional complexity to the role.

Tell me about Milly Alcock, who’s terrific as Meg.

She’s an absolute scene-stealer. An actress friend of mine, Kate Mulvany, who plays the nun in “Hunters” [on Amazon] and is also a writer on “Upright,” had worked with Milly in a small role in an Australian drama … and brought her up. We auditioned loads of people and were looking for a diamond-in-the-rough, someone bolshy and intuitive. We wanted someone maybe a bit plainer and rough-around-the-edges, but her talent was undeniable. She’s incredibly independent. She was 18 when we were shooting “Upright” and she didn’t bring a friend or a chaperone or her mum or anyone to the shoot. Every now and then we’d talk her into coming out for a beer after work, but she usually went back to her room and read books or worked on learning the script. She had a boyfriend in Sydney who never came to visit. They stayed in contact online. Early on the director, Matt Saville, and I had a chat and we decided we shouldn’t get too much up in her grill or direct her too much. Her instincts were so strong.

Did you two bond offscreen like your onscreen characters?

I certainly didn’t need her to be my friend, this 40something bloke who’s going to hang out with her. But over time we got really close. We shot chronologically, so those early scenes we didn’t know each other at all.

Will see a second season of “Upright”?

It’s possible. It really does wrap up in Episode 8 … but we have a Season 2 mapped out.


Source: nypost.com

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Stuck at home? Try painting what you see in video games. These artists do

Published

on

By

As the pandemic persists, visual artists use the virtual world as source material

When the novel coronavirus hit Montreal and lockdown measures began, Maddy Mathews got into video games.

“I mean, one must do things to cope with having a lot of time,” said the artist, laughing at her choice of pandemic hobby.

Idle minds think alike, it seems, because video-game sales have mushroomed since the spring. In April, global game spending hit an all-time record; according to Nielsen SuperData, consumers dropped $10.5 billion US that month. Worldwide demand for PC, mobile and console games is still unusually high. Revenue for June hit $10.46 billion US, up nine per cent from the previous year. Per the Nielsen research, it was the second-highest monthly total since April.

The coronavirus pandemic is the easy explanation, with widespread lockdowns creating a bigger market for things best enjoyed in the great indoors — though Mathews’s interest in gaming is a smidge different from the norm. 

“At the beginning of the pandemic, I was trying to play these old games,” said Mathews, who was working on her MFA at Concordia University when COVID-19 struck. 

“But I don’t really care about actually winning or playing these games.” 

Instead, she just wants to draw them, and she’s definitely not alone.

Plenty of artists borrow from video-game landscapes. In his 2012 series Rare Earth, American artist Mark Tribe mined first-person shooter games, taking screenshots of their more picturesque scenes and placing them next to images of real-life military scenes.

Jim Munroe, artist and co-founder of Toronto’s Hand Eye Society, dropped a law-abiding “Canadian tourist” character inside the world of Grand Theft Auto III. (That scenario played out in his 2003 short film, My Trip to Liberty City.)

Last summer, the TD Arts Wall in Toronto could have been mistaken for the world’s longest Twitch stream thanks to Wood Between Worlds, a piece by local art collective Public Studio, which lit up the corner of Bay and Queen streets from May to September 2019. The looping video mimics an “open world” video game. 

‘I find them really relaxing’

While there are lots of examples of artists using game landscapes as inspiration, the subject matter still seems fresh. There’s an increasingly glitchy line between the virtual and real worlds, especially as the lockdown lifestyle pushes people to engage more with digital spaces. For some folks, those game environments are captivating, and they’re begging to be drawn or painted — if only for the joy of making art.

Mathews puts her favourite game sketches on Instagram: pencil-crayon drawings of random 8-bit environments. Like a lot of her past work, it’s big on nostalgia, though Mathews, 31, is technically too much of a ’90s kid to remember any of the titles she’s drawing: Cranston Manor (1981), Jenny of the Prairie (1983), Labyrinth of Crete (1982). 

“I find them really relaxing,” she said. It’s a hobby — a break from her regular art practice and her coursework. “And I mean, that’s what video games are mostly for.”

Connor Kenney, 29, considers himself a lifelong gamer, but when he needs to unwind, he says he’s just as likely to paint. Kenney’s a resident of Wells, B.C., a town of some 200 people in the Cariboo Mountains. And for a little more than five years, he’s been making the most of his picturesque home base, learning how to paint en plein air with the guidance of another local artist. 

“I just — I love painting landscapes,” said Kenney, who works at a local historical site by day. Still, at some point in 2017, he was desperate for a change of scenery.

“Basically, I got bored,” he said. 

Without a vehicle, he was painting the same mountain ranges.

“So I was like, ‘Well, I have all these video games. And the technology has really expanded. So why don’t I just paint that?'”

Galleries catching on

Since then, games such as Fallout and Red Dead Redemption have been his means of travelling without travelling, and it’s a similar story for Clifford Kamppari-Miller, a web developer in Portland, Ore. Both men have work on display at the Penticton Art Gallery to Sept. 13 as part of an exhibition of game-inspired landscapes. (It’s called En Game Air — which doubles as the title of Kamppari-Miller’s blog.)

Neither he nor Kenney were aware of the other. 

“I don’t really consider myself a painter,” Kamppari-Miller said. He’s more of a dedicated hobbyist, and started the habit when his son was born. 

“At the time, it was hard to go anywhere,” he said. Even now, he keeps an easel by his gaming console.

“A lot of people play video games just to escape,” he continues. “This is a way to get the escapism of games, and also sort of develop a skill while doing it.”

Most of his favourite games boast photo-realistic environments. It’s the same for Kenney, though these graphics are a world away from the decades-old games Mathews loves. Depending on the title, both “en game air” painters can hike (or fly) through virtual landscapes, then tweak the settings so the light is as true-to-life as possible.

“I put my headphones on so I can hear the game sounds, like the wind and trees moving,” said Kenney. One added bonus: no bugs. 

Plein air painting’s all about the emotion that you’re feeling with the landscape,” he said. “So I try to encapsulate the feelings of these digital environments.”

If the idea of being moved by virtual vistas seems odd, it’s no joke to Aden Solway, co-curator of Let’s Play at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Over the summer, the live-streamed lecture series explored how video games shape culture (and vice versa). It wrapped Aug. 5. 

According to Solway, game environments, like traditional landscapes, can “help sensitize or connect you to the world around you.” (Solway felt that way after playing A Short Hike, an indie game set in an abstracted Algonquin Park.) 

Drawing on traditions of plein air painting

In the history of plein air painting — which became popular in the latter half of the 1800s — that sort of connection was key. “I think the impulse around people turning to plein air was because they were looking for ways in which they could get closer to something,” said Solway. 

In part, it was about accurately capturing the light, the colour — the liveliness of nature. 

“They wanted [the painting] to be more real, to retain the same sort of aura or sensibility as the landscape.”

This is a way to get the escapism of games, and also sort of develop a skill while doing it.– Clifford Kamppari-Miller, artist

To Kenney, that’s the thing. 

“For me, video games are very real,” he said. 

The emotions he experiences are real, he explains. For example, Firewatch is one of his favourite titles to paint; the game triggers dramatic memories of B.C. forest fires. And when he has a real-life connection to a game world, he wants to capture it. 

Non-gamers might not understand, but that’s another reason why he paints. 

“With the pandemic, and more people being at home and inside, [it’s] allowed a lot more people to dive into video games, and see that it’s not just this weird kind of geek culture that isn’t for everyone,” said Kenney. 

“[The paintings] are a way to help that dialogue between non-gamers and gamers. To say, ‘Yeah, this is great art form. There’s lots of stuff in here and everyone should give it a try.'”


Source: cbc.ca

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Fans say Betty White should be in Cardi B’s ‘WAP’ video, not Kylie Jenner

Published

on

By


Fans say Betty White should be in Cardi B

Who needs Kim Kardashian’s sister when you could have a golden girl?

After Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion dropped their sultry new track “WAP” featuring a guest appearance by Kylie Jenner, the Twitterverse decided that they wish it were Betty White who was strutting her stuff instead.

“Betty White is trending because people are saying they wish she would have been in #WAP instead of Kylie Jenner. lmaooo,” Yashar Ali tweeted Friday.

The notion is especially side splitting since Jenner, 22, is shown sexily walking down a hallway in a bodysuit that shows off her assets. Still, fans would prefer that 98-year-old White, who played the sweet but air-headed Rose Nylund in “Golden Girls,” be featured in “WAP” which stands for “Wet a– p—y.”

“WAP,” which was released Thursday along with the uber sexy music video, had already racked up over 12 million views Friday afternoon.

“Just imagine the conversation that Betty White’s social media manager has to have with her today about ‘wet a– p—y,’” tweeted Imani Gandy. “Omg please reshoot this video with a Betty White cameo. You know she’d f—ing do it.”

Another Twitter user echoed the demand, tweeting “Okay, now I NEED to see Betty White in that #WAP video. Time for a reshoot,” along with photoshopped image of White in the same hallway Jenner walks down.

Another widely shared GIF shows the septuagenarian shimmying her breasts in a pink chiffon dress, an apt image for what she may have done in the rap music video.

But not everyone was happy to see the spunky grandma trending. Many thought the sudden news meant she had died.

“Y’all have GOT to stop trending Betty White’s name during a PANDEMIC,” one worried user tweeted.

Another chimed in writing, “I hate you people making Betty White trend, I nearly thought she was dead. Y’all suck, though she is a true immortal.”


Source: nypost.com

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Tribeca Film Festival sets 2021 return after coronavirus delay

Published

on

By


Tribeca Film Festival sets 2021 return after coronavirus delay

After it was forced to scrub this year’s edition due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Tribeca Film Festival has announced it will return in 2021. Next year’s festival will run from June 9 to 20 in New York City.

“We look forward to celebrating the 20th anniversary and to honoring what our founders Jane Rosenthal and Robert De Niro have made a reality in bringing storytellers and communities together,” said Tribeca Enterprises Chief Creative Officer Paula Weinstein.

Tribeca Enterprises made the announcement Friday, noting that it reflects shifting calendars and efforts to ensure the festival moves forward in the safest environment.

Submissions will open on Sept. 8 for all categories: feature and short films, episodic storytelling, immersive, branded entertainment, and a newly added section dedicated to online premieres. The submission period has been extended by three weeks; the late deadline is pushed to January, and the eligibility rules are adjusted to include films that have previously screened at online festivals.

The 2020 festival, which had been set for April 15-26, was called off in March as the COVID-19 crisis began taking hold.

Tribeca organizers also announced Friday that they will dedicate space within the 2021 festival to the films whose premieres were not able to take place in 2020. All 2020 Tribeca-selected filmmakers have been invited to showcase their films and celebrate their postponed premieres as part of the 20th anniversary

“As we take our first steps towards the next edition of our festival, we have centered our thoughts and plans on the filmmakers and film-goers who have been so affected by the challenges of the last few months,” said festival director and VP of programming Cara Cusumano. “Whether it’s in the cinema, online, or outdoors, we look forward to welcoming everyone back to an innovative 20th anniversary festival in the spirit of our last 20 years celebrating community and storytelling in all their forms.”


Source: nypost.com

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Hudson & Rex crew member tests positive for COVID-19: sources

Published

on

By

Newfoundland and Labrador records 1st new case since July 26

A crew member of the television show Hudson & Rex is Newfoundland and Labrador’s first new case of COVID-19 since July 26, sources tell CBC News.

In a news release Friday afternoon, the Department of Health and Community Services said there is one new travel-related case of COVID-19 in the province.

The provincial government says the new case is a female in the Eastern Health region, between 20 and 39 years old, who was asymptomatic while travelling on a flight from Toronto on Thursday. 

The release said the woman, who is not from the province and who received a travel exemption, is self-isolating, and contact tracing is underway. Anyone considered a close contact will be advised to self-isolate.

Sources tell CBC News the case involves a member of the production of the Citytv show now filming its third season in St. John’s.

The province’s total caseload moves to 267, with three deaths and 263 recoveries.

On July 27, filming on the program stopped for three hours after crew members from Newfoundland and Labrador raised concerns about a delay in COVID-19 test results for production members from outside the province.

In an email to cast and crew at the time, obtained by CBC News, producer Paul Pope apologized for an “oversight in COVID-19 testing for our come from away cast.”

“We believed that we were operating safely under the provincial COVID-19 guidelines, but now realize that it was an error in judgment,” he wrote, adding that it wouldn’t happen again.

‘Toolbox’ for mitigating risk

Earlier in July, Pope outlined to CBC Radio’s On The Go how the production was minimizing coronavirus risk on set.

“The COVID-19 toolbox that we have to mitigate the risk is extensive,” Pope said July 17, comparing the strategy to maintaining a car.

“In order for your car to drive the engine has to work. The brakes have to work. The windshield wipers have to work. The headlights have to work and, really, you can’t drive the car without all of them.”

The Hudson & Rex “toolbox,” said Pope, includes being in a safe environment — in this case, Newfoundland and Labrador, with its low number of cases — having an adequate supply of personal protective equipment, common-sense measures like physical distancing, and also testing.

Because of cast demands, Pope said in July, each episode requires three to five people from out of province, who could only come if they were asymptomatic. They are tested upon arrival and again 48 hours later, said Pope, and are put up at a hotel closed to the general public.

As of Friday, 26,479 people have been tested across the province — 199 since Thursday. 

The next briefing on COVID-19 in the province is scheduled for Wednesday. 


Source: cbc.ca

Continue Reading

Entertainment

‘Friends’ reunion postponed again on HBO Max due to COVID-19

Published

on

By


Taping of the untitled unscripted “Friends” reunion special for HBO Max has been further delayed by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Originally slated to film right after all production was shut down in mid-March because of the outbreak, it was pushed to May so the special could still be ready for HBO Max’s May 27 launch. With the country in the grips of the pandemic, the taping was postponed again and could not make HBO Max’s debut.

I hear the most recent date was Aug. 17, and there had been initial optimism that production could be pulled off until COVID cases started spiking again, prolonging the ongoing Hollywood shutdown related to the pandemic. I hear that plan was recently called off, and there is no new target date as the situation remains fluid.

In the special, “Friends” stars Jennifer Aniston, Courteney Cox, Lisa Kudrow, David Schwimmer, Matt LeBlanc and Matthew Perry, are slated to return to the iconic comedy’s original soundstage, Stage 24, on the Warner Bros. Studio lot in Burbank to film the reunion special, directed by Ben Winston. The sextet also serve as executive producers alongside Friends creators Kevin Bright, Marta Kauffman and David Crane.

In April, the stars of the show auctioned six tickets to the taping, with the funds benefiting COVID relief.

The special is designed to join all 236 episodes of the Emmy-winning 1994-2004 NBC series, recently revealed by the WarnerMedia as the top show on the streaming platform.

Winston executive produces along with Bright, Kauffman and Crane as well as Aniston, Cox, Kudrow, LeBlanc, Perry and Schwimmer. Emma Conway and James Longman are co-executive producers. The special hails from Warner Bros. Unscripted & Alternative Television and Fulwell 73 Productions.


Source: nypost.com

Continue Reading

Entertainment

‘Bon Appétit Test Kitchen’ star Molly Baz resigns in solidarity amid controversy

Published

on

By


Yet another Bon Appétit Test Kitchen star has resigned — but this time in solidarity with colleagues at the controversy-ridden video channel.

Molly Baz, the Senior Food Editor at Bon Appétit, announced her exit Friday to show support for three colleagues who left the channel. Bon Appétit Test Kitchen contributing writer Priya Krishna, assistant food editor Sohla El-Waylly and contributing food editor Rick Martinez — who make up half of the six people of color featured on the site — announced their departures on Thursday.

“Yesterday we lost three valuable members of our video team,” Baz wrote on Instagram. “I support their decisions unequivocally and am extremely disheartened that Condé Nast Entertainment was unable to provide them contracts that they felt were fair and equitable. I wish I had more to share with you after months of silence, as I know you have all been waiting for change along with me. Sadly, I do not. It is for this reason that I’ve asked CNE to release me from the video obligations of my contract. I will no longer appear on the BA YouTube Channel.”

She goes on to say that she will “continue to work at the magazine as it rebuilds,” explaining that it “is a separate entity from CNE.”

Krishna, El-Waylly and Martinez had reportedly been in five weeks of contract negotiations before their exits, reports Business Insider. El-Waylly will continue to write recipes and Krishna and Martinez will do editorial freelance work for the magazine and website.

Krishna posted a long statement on Twitter discussing the outlet’s “public reckoning.”

The Condé Nast publication has been embroiled in controversy as of late. regarding diversity. In June, Bon Appétit’s longtime Editor-in-Chief Adam Rapoport resigned after a photo surfaced that showed him in brownface. Matt Duckor, head of Condé Nast Entertainment’s lifestyle video programming, stepped down that same month amid allegations that he didn’t feature people of color in Bon Appétit Test Kitchen videos and paid them less than their white colleagues.


Source: nypost.com

Continue Reading

Entertainment

NY Post’s Instagram 2020 Challenge proves this year has been an eternity

Published

on

By


NY Post’s Instagram 2020 Challenge proves this year has been an eternity

Reese Witherspoon challenged the world to visualize how 2020 has embodied the five stages of grief — and The Post took her up on it.

The “Legally Blonde” and “Big Little Lies” actress is credited with sparking the now viral 2020 Challenge, where people post a photo collage, documenting how they felt overall each miserable month with a different facial expression. Due to the madness of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which has made many months feel stuck on a time loop, the challenge is more an exercise in finding increasingly desperate looking photos to assign the seasons than an actual emotion diary.

“Yup. #2020challenge,” Witherspoon, 44, captioned the post which sparked the trend on her Instagram since Wednesday. In the nine-photo collage of her hilarious downfall, Witherspoon looks hopeful in January, accepting in February, panicked in March, distraught in both April and May, and then uses the same photo showing a malaise of misery in June, July, August and September. The post has racked up over 1.4 million likes.

The Post’s “challenge” details how we kicked off this decade reporting on Jennifer Aniston’s infamous hug with Brad Pitt and A-Rod’s interest in buying the Mets before the virus hit in March. Next up: The market continued to plummet in April, New York City remained closed up in May, June and July, and quarantine fatigue set in harder than ever this month — and probably next, too.


Source: nypost.com

Continue Reading

Gossips

Celebrities Gossips1 week ago

Britney Spears: Is the Pop Icon Being Held Captive?

When the phrase first entered the national lexicon, #FreeBritney referred to the push to liberate Britney Spears from her marriage...

Celebrities Gossips1 week ago

Duggar Daughters’ Raciest Outfits: What Dress Code, Jim Bob?!

The ladies of the Duggar family are known for subservience and commitment to their parents’ strict set of moral guidelines....

Celebrities Gossips1 week ago

Meghan & Harry Bring Out the Worst In Each Other, Insider Claims

Back in April, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle officially stepped down from their roles as senior members of the royal...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

David Eason FINALLY Faces Consequences For His Crimes!

It’s been over a month since David Eason pistol-whipped one of Jenelle Evans’ friends, and yet, the former Teen Mom...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

Kanye West Meltdown: Will It Be Documented on KUWTK?

As you’ve likely heard by now, rapper and fashion mogul Kanye West is in the midst of bipolar episode which...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

Meek Mill to Kanye: I Did NOT Bang Kim Kardashian!

By now, you’ve probably heard about Kanye West’s latest Twitter tirade, which looks as though it might result in the...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

Kim Kardashian Met With Divorce Lawyers Following Kanye Twitter Rant

By now, we’re sure you’ve heard about Kanye West’s latest meltdown and the various ways in which the rapper appears...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

Ariana Grande: Pregnancy Rumors Confirmed By Baby Bump Pic?

In some respects, this is the most eventful year any one of us has lived through. But in other ways,...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

Kenneth Petty: Here’s Why Fans Hate Nicki Minaj’s Baby Daddy

On Monday, Nicki Minaj announced that she’s pregnant with her first child, and naturally, the rapper’s millions of devoted fans...

Celebrities Gossips2 weeks ago

Jenelle Evans: Chelsea Houska & Leah Messer Are Fake AF!

Prior to the advent of social media, you came across memories of old social gatherings only when you stumbled upon...

Entertainment

Entertainment14 mins ago

Tim Minchin tries to stay ‘Upright’ in dark, complicated comedy

Two people take a wild ride through the Australian desert in “Upright,” a dark comedy on Sundance Now. The eight-episode...

Entertainment2 hours ago

Stuck at home? Try painting what you see in video games. These artists do

As the pandemic persists, visual artists use the virtual world as source material When the novel coronavirus hit Montreal and...

Entertainment3 hours ago

Fans say Betty White should be in Cardi B’s ‘WAP’ video, not Kylie Jenner

Who needs Kim Kardashian’s sister when you could have a golden girl? After Cardi B and Megan Thee Stallion dropped...

Entertainment3 hours ago

Tribeca Film Festival sets 2021 return after coronavirus delay

After it was forced to scrub this year’s edition due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Tribeca Film Festival has announced...

Entertainment3 hours ago

Hudson & Rex crew member tests positive for COVID-19: sources

Newfoundland and Labrador records 1st new case since July 26 A crew member of the television show Hudson & Rex...

Entertainment3 hours ago

‘Friends’ reunion postponed again on HBO Max due to COVID-19

Taping of the untitled unscripted “Friends” reunion special for HBO Max has been further delayed by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic....

Entertainment5 hours ago

‘Bon Appétit Test Kitchen’ star Molly Baz resigns in solidarity amid controversy

Yet another Bon Appétit Test Kitchen star has resigned — but this time in solidarity with colleagues at the controversy-ridden...

Entertainment5 hours ago

NY Post’s Instagram 2020 Challenge proves this year has been an eternity

Reese Witherspoon challenged the world to visualize how 2020 has embodied the five stages of grief — and The Post...

Entertainment5 hours ago

Robin Williams’ ‘rambling’ Joe Biden bit resurfaces 11 years later

Who needs comedy when you have politics? In the months leading up to the 2020 presidential election, a 2009 HBO...

Entertainment5 hours ago

Former Ice Road Truckers cast member to be sentenced for causing explosion

The man admitted he was trying to make cannabis concentrate when butane ignited A former cast member of the hugely...

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending